June 2016 General Membership Meeting Agenda

GENERAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING

JUNE  15, 2016 — 6:00 PM TO 8:00 PM

AT CENTRAL WHIDBEY ISLAND FIRE & RESCUE

1164 RACE ROAD, COUPEVILLE, WA

                                                                  AGENDA

Call to order                                                              Member and guest introductions

Quorum call                                                              Verification of membership

Approve Agenda                                                     Vote to approve Agenda

Introduction of special guest:  Ms. Arlene Hyatt, Capacity Development Project Manager at the Washington State DOH Office of Drinking Water

Secretary’s Report    Willy LaRue will present the Minutes for the March 17, 2016 General Membership Meeting.  Vote to approve the Minutes.

Treasurer’s Report    John Lovie will present the Treasurer’s Report.  Vote to approve the Treasurer’s Report.

Theme of this meeting: JUST WHO OWNS OUR DRINKING WATER?  UNDERSTANDING WATER LAW IN WASHINGTON STATE

UNDERSTANDING WASHINGTON’S WATER LAW FOR PROFESSIONALS AS WE MOVE INTO THE 21ST CENTURY.

With 2015 being a year of limited water supplies and 2016 having atypical weather patterns, many citizens are asking questions about the legal requirements, challenges, and opportunities to acquiring new or alternative water sources and how the State works toward protecting rivers and streams that support threatened aquatic and wildlife ecosystems.

This presentation will discuss how water rights work in Washington State, how such rights have evolved over time, what their legal status are, and how a water right is acquired. The presentation also will explain how the needs of our natural systems are balanced with competing demands for consumptive uses, and what some of the challenges and opportunities are in acquiring access to water for future needs.

Guest speaker: Mr. John M. Rose, Hydrogeologist (and after hours Hazmat Responder!) with the Water Resources Program at the Washington State Department of Ecology

John Rose began his professional career in the US Navy where he was a navigation specialist. He later obtained a Bachelor’s of Science in Geology from the University of Arizona and a Master’s Degree from University of Oregon along with a post-graduate certification in Geographic Information Systems from the University of Washington. He had worked extensively in the mining industry in Mexico and Arizona before moving to the Pacific Northwest. He has a decade worth of experience working with groundwater studies, policy, and water law with the Department of Ecology. In addition John also is a part time member of Ecology’s Environmental Hazmat Response Team. In his spare time he enjoys boating, archery, camping and annoying his neighbors by attempting to play the bagpipes.

Floor open for questions and general discussion

Adjourn

WIWSA President’s Message June 2016

Just recently, I had the pleasure and opportunity to sit with three representatives of a local ground water system which had just added new residents to their community and were moving up from a Group B to a Group A water system.  You all know our WIWSA mantra about the smartest thing that a Group B can do is to behave like a Group A water system by observing the federal and state rules for the larger systems.  Those rules were put into place in order to protect communities from unsafe drinking water and unwise business practices. The folks who took the time to visit with me wanted a plan for stepping up to the requirements for a more intensely regulated water system and I was happy to help them. 

Fortunately, our WIWSA Board of Directors includes persons with broad practical experience in every facet of ground water production and distribution and I urge all of our members to take advantage of that resource.  Please remember that there is no such thing as a “silly question” when it comes to purveying safe water to our friends and neighbors!

Warm regards, Jim Patton

Drinking in the View

Drinking in the View

BY SHARON BETCHER Whidbey Life Magazine Contributor May 18, 2016

On the island, water can seem mesmerizingly ubiquitous. We drink in the view from every possible angle. But drinking in the aqueous view can deceive us. Despite the water that stretches to the horizon in every direction, we actually have a limited supply of fresh drinking water, and that supply is intimately related to our habits—from where we build our homes to how our excretes percolate through the soil and reenter the groundwater.

More…